‘A man’s G-spot is in his anus, straight or gay’ – Nigerian Facebook user

0

A Nigerian Facebook user, Buchi Stein Emezue took to the comment section of a Facebook post to spill some secret about sex some ladies don’t know.

According to him, the male folks have their own G-spot as the anus, irrespective of the guy’s sexuality. Buchi said, the fear of being called gay makes some men oppose having their anus touch. Here’s the exchange below that captured the Nigerian Facebook user’s ‘revelation’;

Well according to Times, we hear a lot about the Big Three Sexualities — straight, bisexual and gay. Most of us assume that these three orientations encompass the universe of sexual identities, but there is a new kid on the block: The mostly straight male.

To the uninitiated, mostly straight may seem paradoxical. How can a man be mostly heterosexual? If you’re a young man, you might assume that either you’re straight or you’re not, meaning you’re likely gay and maybe bisexual. Yet the evidence suggests that more young men identify or describe themselves as mostly straight, than identify as either bisexual or gay combined.

A 2011–2013 U.S. government poll found that among 18- to 24-year-old men, 6% marked their sexual attractions as “mostly opposite sex.” That’s nearly 1 million young men. Yet when these men were forced to choose between straight, bisexual or gay, about three-quarters marked straight because for them bisexual, even if it is understood as “bisexual-leaning straight,” is too gay to accurately describe their identity. Given such constraints, these young men were left with no place to truthfully register their sexuality, thus forcing them to be less than honest.

“Mostly straight” is a category that was not readily available to previous generations of men. A 2015 survey revealed striking contrasts across age groups. One question asked, “Thinking about sexuality, which of the following comes closer to your view?”

  • “There is no middle ground—you are either heterosexual or you are not.”
  • “Sexuality is a scale—it is possible to be somewhere near the middle.”

A majority of millennials endorsed the second option, which means they believe in a spectrum of sexuality. Adults from other generations preferred the first, which signifies a two-category approach — straight, not straight — to sexuality.

Leave A Reply

css.php